My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Sunday—On Thursday afternoon Dr. and Mrs. Syngman Rhee, of Korea, came to see me and brought me two of Dr. Rhee's books, one of them a pamphlet on Korea. I had never met Dr. Rhee before, but a very beautiful spirit shines in his face, and the patience which one feels his countrymen must have exercised through the past many years is present in the gentleness of his expression. Someday I hope that Korea can live again in peace and security in a world where such conditions are possible to small nations as well as large ones.

* * *

Friday morning I had the pleasure of seeing Miss Loula Dunn, Commissioner of Welfare in Alabama, who is just leaving to visit Great Britain as one of the OWI speakers. I think Great Britain is making a very great effort to bring about more knowledge of the United States and our people among her citizens.

I recently had an opportunity to look over some of the courses conducted in the different grades in various English schools, together with some compositions written by several youngsters on the United States which I thought were very interesting. We would need to revise some of our textbooks to do anything similar here, but I think it might be valuable for us to bring our thinking on Great Britain more up to date. We allow so many of our youngsters to focus primarily on the Revolutionary period and the War of 1812. Much of the suspicion and antagonism which some of our citizens feel toward Great Britain grows out of the fact that we do not bring our teaching up to date.

* * *

On Friday afternoon the Rt. Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada, arrived to visit us. We had a very pleasant, quiet dinner, after which the President took the Prime Minister off to converse on important matters.

I spent Saturday in Philadelphia, leaving Washington by the 7 a.m. train and getting home in time for dinner. I reached Philadelphia in time to hear Representative Helen Gahagan Douglas make the opening speech at the conference held under the auspices of the University Club of Philadelphia. The overall subject was "A Program for Women Today." The morning was taken up with a variety of forums, some of which I attended; and after speaking at the luncheon I came back to Washington.

This morning I am receiving four Canadian Wrens, who are coming to see the White House. One of them lives at Grand Manan Island out in the Bay of Fundy, beyond the Island of Campobello where we have had a cottage for so many years.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL