My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—We spent yesterday evening looking over some of the things which the President and our daughter brought home with them from their recent trip.

King Ibn Saud had brought some very beautiful native garments when he came to visit the President. The headdresses worn by the men are of such fine wool material that they would make wonderful shawls. If it were not for the embroidery, the soft material would go through a lady's ring—and that, I was taught in my youth, was the test of a really good shawl of that particular variety. The ladies' embroidered silks have very wonderful gold and colored embroidery, and are a gorgeous combination of colors. The gold bracelet sent me by Emperor Haile Selassie is as soft and pliable as any material, and he gave my daughter a very beautiful string of gold beads.

It was very pleasant earlier in the day to see Dr. Levering Tyson again, president of Muhlenberg College, who brought his son here for luncheon. The latter is on his way to the Columbia Midshipman's School, and I am sure he is going to find the sea a congenial atmosphere.

In the early afternoon I visited the Red Cross B'nai B'rith surgical dressing unit at the Walsh Club House, where every room was filled with busy workers. They told me that they began the project at the start of the war and have never let up, nor had there been the least difficulty in keeping their workers on duty. That is quite a record. This unit also does the stretching and cutting of the gauze for other workers besides their own group.

At 4 o'clock the 40 boys and girls who are attending the five-day Science Talent Institute in Washington came to see the White House, and I had the pleasure of spending a few minutes with them. They represent the top young high school scientists, having been chosen from among 15,000 high school students.

In between times I saw a number of other people and had a few guests at tea.

Since writing the other day about what Tide was doing for returning servicemen in the advertising field, Advertising Age has sent me a copy of a "pony" edition which they are sending free to servicemen interested in keeping up with the news in the advertising and marketing fields. They sent out more than 8,000 copies in December. Some of the difficulties which Advertising Age told me they had in reaching discharged servicemen, it seems to me, might be met by a little more cooperation on the part of the government. Perhaps when these problems are better understood, by the Veterans Administration and by the various businesses involved, new ways may be devised to reach and help the discharged servicemen.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL