My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—Yesterday I had a buffet luncheon at which were included some of the Democratic Congresswomen, the wives of new Representatives and Senators, the wives of officials in the government and in the military services.

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Many of you have probably been asked, as I have been, by various organizations to which you belong and which are interested in world peace, whether you can do anything to spread information on the Dumbarton Oaks proposals prior to the San Francisco meeting in April.

I had the amusing experience in talking to people about these proposals to find that the name seems to have caused some confusion. People seem to think the proposals have something to do with trees, or perhaps have their origin in some foreign country!

The League of Women Voters and the churches are undertaking educational programs, and so I asked the women's division of the Democratic National Committee if they would put on a panel on the subject right after our luncheon yesterday.

It is a completely nonpartisan subject and one in which all of us should be interested. Mrs. Charles W. Tillett, vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee, had on her panel Miss Fannie Hurst, the author; Mrs. William H. Davis, wife of the chairman of the National War Labor Board; the Hon. Emily Taft Douglas, member of Congress from Illinois, and Mrs. Joseph Lash, who is working for Miss Doris Byrne, vice chairman of the New York State Democratic Committee.

With the chart they put up, one can see very graphically what the proposals are for a world organization. I think everybody must have gone away with a better understanding of the proposals.

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In the evening some friends who were staying in the house and Senator and Mrs. Fulbright went with me to the concert given by the Philadelphia Orchestra. It was a delightful evening and I particularly enjoyed the Brahms Symphony No. 4 and the suite of Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier."

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I left the house this morning at nine o'clock, spent two hours at Forest Glen, which is the convalescent part of Walter Reed hospital, and stopped for a few minutes at Walter Reed on the way back. I reached the Chamber of Commerce building, where they were having a report luncheon on the drive for the National Symphony Orchestra fund, by twelve-thirty. The luncheon was a very minor part of the meeting, since everyone had a box luncheon, but I enjoyed my sandwiches and coffee very much and was delighted to learn how well the drive was going and I enjoyed Dr. Kindler's speech.

They are very anxious to get a building for the orchestra, which will make it possible to reduce one of their big items of expense. It seems to me that the government may very well consider building a hall to house the National Symphony, as they have built the National Gallery. In so doing they could also foster some of the other arts which are as important as our collections of paintings and books.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL