My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—Yesterday afternoon I went to the cathedral for the service held under the auspices of the Federation of Churches of Christ in America, in collaboration with the cathedral. The service itself seemed to me a very fine and fitting one for the times in which we live, but the sermon made a particularly deep impression on me.

The clergyman, Dr. Peter Marshall, of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, told us, first, to face our shortcomings as a people: our complacency, our apathy, our pride in our own achievements. Then he reminded us that righteousness is always a prerequisite to peace, and humbleness is a necessary attribute without which there can be no righteousness. He added that we must have peace at home if we hoped to help bring peace in the world.

There is only one way to have peace at home, and that is for the individual who wants peace not just to think of it in the abstract, but to realize that the desire must translate itself into daily action. Peace must enter into our business life and influence our contacts with every individual in the community. The old democratic teaching of the value of the individual human being, regardless of race, creed or color, and the need for equality of opportunity will have to be accepted before peace will come at home or abroad. This is a hard lesson for us to accept, and yet it must be learned before we can hope to accomplish anything on a worldwide basis.

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At this morning's press conference, Miss Charl Williams told the story of the roster of American women, and answered questions about it. This roster or list was compiled as a result of a meeting held in the White House last June. It does not pretend to include all the women available, but simply is a list which will be at hand for the use of any department wishing to find a woman qualified to be of service in some particular field.

Mrs. Esther Brunauer and Miss Dorothy Fosdick, of the State Department, came to talk to the press conference women about the Dumbarton Oaks plan, and the effort which the State Department is making to acquaint the people of the nation with the meaning of these proposals. Whenever possible, members of the State Department staff are addressing groups of key people from various organizations in different parts of the country, explaining the proposals made under the Dumbarton Oaks agreement, and answering questions.

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I was very glad to see that my old friend, Louis Ruppel, had done a very complete job of publicizing the discharged serviceman's pin some days ago in his Chicago paper. I hope that all papers will do the same, and if any change is made in the pin I hope that this, too, will be given wide publicity.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL