My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—I was very much interested today in talking to Judge Anna Moskowitz Kross, who is to be chairman of the Committee on Youth Conservation of the General Federation of Women's Clubs. The committee is not only going to study the whole situation of youth in this country which has led to increased juvenile delinquency, but is going to try to do something about it.

The consciences of American men and women seem really stirred. Shortly there will be held in New York City a conference sponsored by a number of agencies concerned with family welfare, where the best interests of the family will be discussed, having in mind, naturally, the best development of the child.

On Tuesday, January 9, the Public Education Association and the New York Times will hold the first of three meetings at Times Hall. At these meetings some of the country's leading educators will discuss child educational problems growing out of the war and try to forecast some of the problems we may expect in the postwar period. Some of the speakers will be President Dodd of Princeton University; President Day of Cornell; U.S. Commissioner of Education, John Studebaker; President Johnson of Howard University; President Warren of Sarah Lawrence College; Dr. George Zook, president of the American Council of Education; and Senator Lister Hill.

These speakers seem to me to promise a discussion of some of the most difficult questions facing us in education today, and I am very glad that so many responsible organizations are focusing on the ways and means by which we can prevent juvenile delinquency. It is so much better to prevent it than to wait until it has come about and we have to try to cure it.

We have been hearing a good deal lately anent the sad tale of the matches. Good people, you are probably not going to be able to get "strike-on-the-box" matches, or the paper book matches for use here at home. One hundred percent of the former and 35 percent of the book matches will be going to our boys overseas in the next six months. Be calm, however; you will still have matches, and they will be the matches all of us who have reached the ripe age of 60 can remember using in the days when we were young. Men and women of America can certainly revert to the use of these matches, and there will be 200 billion or thereabouts available. They are known as "strike anywhere" matches or kitchen matches. We kept a box hanging near the fireplace and the stove when I was young, and there is one right this minute by my open fireplace in the sitting room of our New York apartment.

It is a little harder to carry them around, perhaps, but it will give us a chance to look up any pretty boxes which are the right size. Then we can tuck them away in our pockets or handbags—so this is one shortage we can all cheer up about.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL