My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Tuesday—Most of my day yesterday was consumed in a very pleasant drive to Suffern, N. Y., a lunch and a talk there and the return drive in the afternoon. A few people came in to tea, and in the evening I went over to speak at the Downtown Community School, which is putting on a series of lectures for adults. This seems a very wise thing to do. Feeling that children are under the influence of their homes as much as they are under the influence of the school, the Downtown school is trying to take up community problems with the parents as well as with the children, so that there will be no real divergence in the efforts of the school and the home in influencing the children.

The evening papers yesterday carried much cheerful news. There seems to be hope of an accord in China, and Mr. Cordell Hull has been awarded the 1945 Nobel Peace Prize. That is a fitting tribute for his long years of public service.

* * *

One article in the N. Y. World-Telegram interested me very much. Part of a survey of our national resources, it was done in response to a very sensible suggestion advanced by Bernard M. Baruch. Mr. Baruch said that, before we make loans to other nations, we should know exactly what our own resources for the future are going to be.

A survey of this kind seems to me important, but it is difficult to estimate what you can do in the future, since the work of our engineers and scientists is one of the unpredictable elements in the picture. None of us knows what substitutes may be found for resources which were considered vital in the pre-atomic age, and none of us knows what might be worked out by cooperation with other nations.

The suggestion in this article is that a world conference be held, at which world resources would be considered and future plans made. These would rest very largely on a basis of better production in many lands and better trade facilities, those facilities to be so planned as to increase the prosperity of many nations. That is almost like world pioneering, and ought to appeal to the adventurous spirit in our own country.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL