My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—The National War Fund had a very good meeting in Bridgeport, Conn., Monday night. Governor Baldwin and Mayor McLevy were there and, judging by the speakers who were present, labor and management were working closely together. Everyone recognizes that to raise the very large sums of money needed this year requires a special effort. The local Community Chests will need greater support than usual, because of the reconversion period. The various foreign relief agencies in the fund must be supported because UNRRA is limited by law as to where it can go and what it can do, and many gaps must be filled. The USO services at home and abroad must be increased.

They have a servicemen's center in Bridgeport which I should like to see duplicated in every city of any size throughout the country. They give tangible help to the men coming out of the service who need advice of any kind, or help in obtaining employment, or information as to their rights under the GI bill.

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It was late when Miss Esther Lape, who had driven over from Westbrook to meet me, finally got us home; but a good night's sleep lay before us and the drive back to New Haven Tuesday morning was a great treat. Gray early morning clouds gradually cleared and the colors came out, brilliantly red and yellow, everywhere we looked.

The lunch at New Haven, sponsored by the Connecticut Federation of Democratic Women's Clubs, was also attended by the heads of a great number of other women's organizations of the state. It was really a nonpartisan meeting, since peace was the subject under consideration and that is of interest to everybody, regardless of party affiliation.

President Blunt, of Connecticut Woman's College, came back on the train to New York with me and I enjoyed the opportunity for a little more talk with her.

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On arrival here I spent a little time in the office signing mail, and then Miss Thompson and I started out to get a taxi to come home. We not only couldn't get a taxi, but we couldn't get a bus for a very long time. It seems to me that New York City is more crowded and congested with both people and traffic than I have ever known it. I should think there would have to be, before long, new regulations about parking and some new arrangements made for taking up the excess truck traffic, which at present makes getting around the city practically impossible during crowded hours. It is understandable that, as a result of the war, there should be a shortage of taxicabs and that many of the taxis are in poor condition; but I hope that here, and in other cities like our own, one of the first needs the automobile manufacturers will meet is the demand for new taxis. I have seen people standing at the railroad station with heavy bags, waiting for long periods of time to find some way of getting home.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL