My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Those of us who live in the country are far along with our canning for the year, but there is still some canning to be done.

A long while ago I was sent, on behalf of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, their community canning program for war relief. I meant to tell you about it because I thought many more people might cooperate than those mentioned on the pamphlet—which states that the program is being carried on in association with the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Foods Distribution Programs Branch of Production and Marketing Administration; Federal and State Extension Services, Nutrition Programs Branch; U. S. Office of Education, including Camp Fire Girls, Inc. and Girl Scouts. I am sure, though they are not listed, that the 4-H Clubs, through the Department of Agriculture, have cooperated.

Through the program, all users of community canning centers have been asked to can 10 percent over their own local requirements and to give this surplus for overseas relief. Contributions will be shipped abroad by UNRRA.

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I feel that many individuals who do not can in community centers, or in cooperation with any of the groups mentioned, may have products that they have canned and will still can, which they could spare and send to the headquarters of one of these groups in their communities to swell the amount that goes overseas. It is hard for us here to realize what the needs will be in almost every country outside of North and South America.

I have been hoping that some arrangements would be arrived at whereby one administrator would be appointed for the distribution of coal and the rehabilitation of transportation throughout Europe. It seems to me until that is done, it is going to be extremely difficult to start people over there on an upward trend, and it is going to be extremely difficult to distribute properly what relief is sent abroad.

There is food in certain parts of Europe. For instance, certain parts of France even now could send food to other parts if their transportation were not completely ruined, and coal were not completely impossible to obtain. Denmark was not ruined as a food-producing country by the Germans because Allied airplanes disrupted the German transportation system.

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I have seen in the papers that the rivers will be used as a method of distribution, but that will not adequately meet transportation needs.

While I think we should bend every effort to save from our own plenty and ship to countries where starvation stalks the land, I think we should not forget one thing. That is, to urge that there be immediate consideration of a plan whereby some able administrator is put in charge of coal production and transportation, especially in the European field.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL