My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—It is becoming increasingly apparent each day that more assistance is needed for veterans—especially disabled veterans—in job placement and the development of business opportunities. The educational reconditioning program which functions in convalescent hospitals is already much curtailed because of lack of funds. It will apparently be even more curtailed, since the agency authorized by Congress to handle this important function, I am told, has not been voted the necessary appropriation to carry on their work.

No alternate service in any other agency has been appointed to do this work. As a result, more than 600 offices to which the veterans should have access for consultation on job finding and adjustment problems may be scheduled to close unless by Executive order, or prompt Congressional approval, they are given the power to function.

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The servicemen themselves, as long as they remain in the service, cannot write to their Senators and Congressmen, for that is against Army regulations. But friends or relatives who know that the men need advice and help can write to their own Congressmen and Senators, pointing out that the sudden end of war is going to make this situation extremely critical, especially for the disabled veterans.

There are going to be many civilians, out of jobs in war plants, seeking new jobs. There will be many discharged veterans, with new skills acquired during the war, looking for new jobs or trying to fit into their old ones again. The disabled veteran, at best, will have education for some special type of job; but he must find out where that job exists, and it is not going to be as easy for him to move from place to place. Even if he stays in one city, moving from factory to factory or employment agency to employment agency will be difficult. Therefore, if you have an interest in getting increased services made available to the men as they leave our military branches, write immediately to your Senators and Congressmen.

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In New York State certain private agencies, like the New York State Masonic Grand Lodge, are providing funds to supply this deficiency, and the state itself is doing something to help. But in some other states, comparable assistance is not provided either by state or private agencies.

Many a woman who did not work before the war may be forced to do so if the men returning from the war do not find jobs which they are capable of doing and which are suited to their physical and emotional needs.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL