My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—It has always amused me how much Fala has really become a personality in this country! I had been looking for a carrier in which to take him on the train to New York, and I was told I would find one at a certain establishment in Manhattan. There, the man at once said to me: "Is this for Fala?" I explained that Fala was accustomed to rather luxurious train travel, having always been entirely free to roam in my husband's private car, and that I was looking for something that would not frighten him. The man very kindly explained to me that if I put Fala in backwards he would not be as frightened as he would if I forced his head in first. I really think it would be simpler if I sat with him in the baggage car, but then I might not be a welcome passenger!

When Fala does move to New York, it will be the first time in his five years of dog life that he has had to take his airings entirely on a leash. I am sure the apartment is going to seem very small, too; but since he always adapted himself to whatever my husband wanted him to do, I hope he will meet these new conditions just as successfully!

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I have had to be in New York City for some time, and among other things I did a little sightseeing with several of my grandchildren. We visited Theodore Roosevelt House on East 20th Street. There I tried to remember all the tales that my aunt, Mrs. Douglas Robinson, used to tell about their childhood in the house, since that is the only way to interest the young of this generation in their ancestors.

David, aged three, had to be carried in order to see the cases in the museum side, and I found that quite exhausting. We rode the top of a bus to Rockefeller Plaza, where we admired the colors of the water lilies in the various basins. Twice we lunched at the Algonquin Hotel, and I am quite sure that they rarely have such unsophisticated guests. Our three and five-year-olds were so fascinated by the many things to see that I could hardly make them eat.

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We visited the Natural History Museum together and enjoyed it very much, but the rest of their sightseeing was done with their father. I am quite sure it was many years since he had seen the Bronx Zoo as thoroughly as when he walked about for a whole morning with his children.

They have now gone back to their home in Texas, and I know that when I return to Hyde Park it is going to seem like a very lonely place without them.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL