My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—Over the radio this morning I heard the sad tales of the losses from floods in the western part of our state. I know that many of our farmers here in the Hudson valley have had crops ruined by the rain. and in addition are having great difficulty in getting labor enough to bring in the crops which they have. Right here on our own place we have men and women working on jobs which they never did before and that, I imagine, is duplicated on many farms throughout the country.

Yet the rain has been wonderful for the woods. As I walk every morning with Fala, I realize that it is a long time since I have seen our little planted pines make such a growth, or found such luxuriance of foliage everywhere. It is a grand year for mosquitoes, too. Sometimes I think I'll never walk past some of our swamps again till autumn, but then the beauty of the ferns draws me back.

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Fala, too, has such a wonderful time hunting whatever may be the hidden things in that particular part of the woods, that I can't bear not to take him there. Occasion he gets a scent and disappears entirely I can't stand and wait for him, because the mosquitoes then settle on me with too much ease. So I walk on just as far as possible meanwhile singing in unmusical fashion and as loudly as possible all the hymns I can remember from my childhood days. That seems to bring Fala back more quickly than calling him by name.

Our garden has done pretty well and we are getting vegetables in great quantity, but my family has been so large all summer that I have not had a chance to put as much into the freezer as I otherwise might have done. In August, however, I shall have to be away from here for a time, and I am counting on putting many things up for the winter months. My freezer, which is a new acquisition, makes it possible to plan for the future and use one's surplus.

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Today we have the last of our picnics for the boys at the Wiltwyck school. I am glad to have had them all before my grandchildren leave next month, because they have been such excellent hosts and have helped so much in the games and general entertainment.

This is a quiet life we lead up here, but it seems nevertheless to be a busy one. People are coming to tea today, and late this afternoon Postmaster and Mrs. Hannegan, Paul Fitzpatrick and Miss Doris Byrne, chairman and vice chairman respectively of the Democratic state committee, are all coming to spend the night. Tomorrow we attend the ceremonies at the post office when the stamp issued in memory of my husband, showing the Hyde Park house, is first put on sale.

E. R.
PNews, NSJ, 28 July 1945