My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—I came back to the country Saturday afternoon. My household had been augmented by three, but no one was as vociferously pleased to see me as Fala. He really does not see much sense in our going away, but he settles down very happily with whoever stays at home to look after him. Since a child has now come to play with him, his cup of joy is running over.

I told my young six-year-old guest that I would show him our "secret woods," a wonderful pine grove where the needles have been falling for so long that you sink in and walk noiselessly and where everything around you looks mysterious. You can imagine almost anything just across the brook or just behind the next tree.

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My day in Washington was interesting. In the morning I attended the ceremony when President Truman gave Mrs. Edwin Watson the Medal for Distinguished Service which my husband had planned to award to General Watson because of the valuable service which he had rendered. My husband was devoted to General Watson, and I was very happy to be there with Mrs. Watson.

I saw a number of people, members of Congress, some of the Cabinet, and old friends. I was particularly glad that Mrs. Morgenthau was home at last and on her way to health and strength again.

It was with sadness that I saw my daughter and her husband and little Johnny Boettiger depart for Seattle, but she and her family will be very happy to be back in their own home again. I can only be deeply grateful that her father and I were able to have her with us and to enjoy her company during the last year and a half. She meant a great deal to her father, and this was one of the strange by-products of the war which I count as a blessing; for if her husband had not been away in the service she would not have been able to be with us.

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On the train trip to and fro, I was able to read many of the things I have been saving up against the time when I could sit quietly without the interruptions of my home. Among the most interesting was the May issue of Survey Graphic, the tenth in the "Calling America" series which has as its subject the British and ourselves. The lead article by Herbert Agar, called "Our Last Great Chance," I think none of us should fail to read. It is a magnificent exposition of some of the problems and possibilities which lie before us in the near future. It is simple enough for all of us to understand, but is backed by all of the author's experience of the past years in Europe.

E. R.

TMs, AERP, FDRL