My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—Friday in New York City was a tempestuous day, but in spite of the fact that I had come from Washington without bringing along any rainy day clothes, I managed to weather the day satisfactorily.

Fortunately, most of it was spent at home. After two meetings at my apartment at 9:30 and 10, I did venture forth to see my cousin, Mrs. Henry Parish. Then I came home to a leisurely lunch and talk with the four young cousins who, once or twice a year, manage to get together and keep me up on news pertaining to that little part of my family.

One of them now has a son in France, another a boy in training for the navy, and a third a daughter who has completed her nurse's training and is waiting for her army orders. I can remember all of them when they were little girls. In retrospect the time seems short, but 30-odd years ago I thought there were just endless years ahead.

I suppose that is what happens to all of us. Yet it does give the feeling that one must not waste time as one grows older, but spend it for the things that one feels are really worthwhile.

I had made an appointment at 4 o'clock for Madame Kung to come and spend a quiet hour with me. To my astonishment, not only Madame Kung, but five other people whom I had expected at 5 o'clock, walked in all together. It turned out very pleasantly, however, and I think all enjoyed their unexpected tea party. I am quite sure that the discussion my five guests had expected to have with me was really far more interesting because of the very pleasant opportunity of talking with Madame Kung.

A quiet dinner, and an evening to catch up on mail and letters, ended the day.

I had expected to leave for Washington at 8 o'clock on Saturday morning, but late Friday afternoon the sad news came that Monroe Douglas Robinson, one of my first cousins, had died, and that the funeral services would be held at noon on Saturday. I was very fond of this cousin, who was somewhere near my brother's age. Though the opportunities for seeing him had not been very frequent, we always enjoyed those occasions when we were together.

I was able to change my afternoon engagements in Washington, and did not leave New York until 2:30. I got back in time for my evening appointment with some American University students, but I will tell you about that tomorrow.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL