My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—I lunched yesterday with the members of the American Newspaper Women's Club. They reminded me of the fact that they were celebrating for me approximately nine years as a columnist! It was rather a shock, as I had not realized I had been writing "My Day" for quite that length of time.

I am rather proud of the fact, however, that during that time I think my column has only once missed getting in before my deadline. There have been a few times when both the United Feature Syndicate and Miss Thompson or I have put in a few hectic hours trying to find out what had happened to the column, or trying to find a way to get it sent in. But on the whole I think my record is good!

I shared honors at the luncheon with Miss Vera Bloom, whose book on Washington has just been published. She remarked that she was glad to find that a prediction which had been made to her before publication had not come true. Someone told her that those not included in her book would be annoyed, while those included might not like what she said, and therefore no one would speak to her! She said she felt that everyone had been generous and accepted what she had written in the spirit in which she had written it.

At 3 o'clock I attended the United Nations bazaar. It was crowded as usual, so I am sure it was a great success.

In the evening Judge Robert Marks, my husband's old friend from Cincinnati, who is staying with us, had dinner here. Then I dashed off to speak at the forum run by the WAVES in their barracks near American University. The subject was postwar readjustment, and the questions were thoughtful and interesting. Present were some of the students from American University who are taking a course designed to prepare them for work with the Disabled Veterans of Foreign Wars. All of them are veterans, and I am hoping to have them come here some evening in the near future and tell me a little about their work and their experiences.

This morning and this afternoon the East Room in the White House was given over to a conference held by the War Recreation Workers Association. I sat with them from 9:30 until 11:30, when they adjourned for lunch. I heard Capt. Mildred McAfee of the U. S. Naval Reserve, Roy Sorenson of the National Council of the YMCA and John I. Neasmith, regional recreation representative of the Federal Security Agency, all of whom gave very excellent papers.

Training and leadership for recreation seems to be one of our problems in wartime, but I am sure it will continue to be of great importance to our communities in peacetime. Mr. Sorenson said that the last war had given tremendous impetus to community recreation, and he felt that this war would further stimulate community interest in this field, which will certainly be a very important one in the future.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL