My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—We got back from Hyde Park this morning and were immediately plunged into a riot of dogs, because Miss Laura Delano, who came back with us, brought one of her red setters; Fala, of course, was with us; Anna and Johnny with Ensign, their Labrador retriever, met us at the door; and a new mastiff puppy, two months old, was disporting herself around us in typical puppy fashion!

Every day, while I was in Hyde Park, I took a long walk in the woods with the dogs up there. We had beautiful weather and I discovered that when the leaves are down, walking through the woods is very revealing. You learn so many secrets that the trees in their summer garb hide from you. You see how many trees have been blown over by the various storms, and what a nice, warm blanket of leaves covers all the ground in anticipation of winter's cold and frost.

The little ponds had just a thin coating of ice; but the brooks were still running merrily, and here and there, where a log had fallen across a shallow place, the leaves were piling up and creating a little dam to impede the flow of the stream. The rocks show up so much more clearly, and though I thought of the many times in the past that I had climbed them, I wasn't quite sure that either the dogs or I would find them as easily to scale in these days.

On the 23rd of this month the SPARS, the women's reserve of the Coast Guard, completed two years of service. There are more than 10,000 women enrolled, and they are enrolled for the duration and six months thereafter. Their work has been highly praised by the officers and men of the Coast Guard, and they have shown real patriotism, for many of them gave up good civilian jobs and left comfortable homes. Separation from family and friends is always hard; and for a woman, taking the training, accepting full military discipline and, above all, living in barracks is probably harder than for a young man. Therefore, I think we owe the women in all the military services our gratitude and a word of congratulation and praise when their anniversaries come around. I tender mine to the SPARS with heartfelt thanks.

There has come to my desk a publication for which we have to thank the Welfare Council of New York City. It is published by the Contributors Information Bureau, and it is a statement of the standards to be applied to voluntary welfare and health agencies appealing to the public for financial support. I think many people, both social workers and individuals interested in charitable work, will be anxious to send for this publication.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL