My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—I had a few busy hours in New York City yesterday morning, doing the things I had not been able to do the day before because I had spent a morning on the train peacefully reading "The First Round," by Joseph Gaer.

The book is worth spending a few hours on, and will give you a clear picture of the CIO Political Action Committee. My time on the train was not completely uninterrupted, however. A young man who had worked with our son, Elliott, years ago, and who in fact had his start in radio work with him in Texas, came to my compartment to tell me he is now working in Chicago.

Then two sailor boys wandered in to talk, and later three soldiers, discharged after going through the campaigns in Africa, Sicily and Italy, chatted on many subjects. They were going back to the world of civilians, but I didn't find in any of them a great zest for the opportunities which lay ahead. Perhaps in our communities we ought to make a little more fuss about the men coming back from the wars. They should have a pride in their accomplishments, a feeling that the work here at home needs them very much, and, above everything else, that their wishes for their country in the future are going to count with the people in their communities.

Having promised long ago to be a speaker and join in a radio program at the dinner given by Theta Sigma Phi to the South American women journalists on Wednesday in Washington, I took the train back, fulfilled my promise, and took the midnight for New York City, in order to join some of my family for Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving Day was a quiet one, with only a small group of us elders around. I imagine we are doing what many other people in this country are doing—working at our usual jobs, except for a brief interlude in the evening.

There is one thing I have not been able to do in New York because of my very brief time there, and which I genuinely regret having missed. On the 19th, at the American British Art Center, 44 West 56th Street, Maxim Kopf opened his exhibition of paintings. Although the exhibition runs until December 2, I shall unfortunately not be back until after that date. This is a real regret and I shall hope to find some future opportunity, perhaps, to catch a glimpse of these paintings in the artist's own studio.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL