My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—Friday afternoon in Washington I spent an hour or more going through a ward at the Naval Hospital where the plastic surgery cases are being treated. We have made great advances in this art during the war, and I was much encouraged by seeing the really wonderful results which have been attained in many difficult cases. It will mean so much to young men who might otherwise have carried very bad scars for the rest of their lives.

In the evening I went to an open house meeting of the Camp Fire Girls and was presented with an adult membership pin.

On Saturday morning I attended the graduation exercises at American University of one of the Red Cross groups. Training courses for the various branches of Red Cross work are held there, and the activity really resembles a three-ring circus.

People come in every Monday morning for a course of training which lasts for varying periods. If they are not immediately needed, they are given some field work in this country before going overseas. Of course, some of them are going to work in this country permanently, and for them field training is not so important, since they can afford to get it on the job. But very often the need overseas is so great that they start for their final destination after a short period in the university courses. For this reason the training period has to do both a theoretical and a practical educational job. I think the faculty is really extraordinary in its achievements.

I had a few ladies at lunch on Saturday in honor of Mrs. Thomas J. Walsh. Then, after attending the bazaar of the Parish Guild at St. Thomas Church, I had a tea in honor of the South American women journalists who have come here as guests of the Women's National Press Club and the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. These women are all distinguished journalists from Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Peru and Uruguay.

We went first to the President's office so they could have an opportunity to speak to him. Then we returned to the White House for tea and coffee, where we were joined by members of the Women's National Press Club and women representatives from the CIAA staff.

In the evening Governor and Mrs. Ingram M. Stainback of Hawaii, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Bowles and a few other friends came for dinner. Afterward Lt. Robert Catlow, who has been a patient at Walter Reed Hospital, came with Miss Barbara Nash and Miss Campbell to give us a short concert. Lt. Catlow will shortly be working out at Forest Glen on an entertainment program for the patients. His own recovery and ability to sing is a tribute to the wonderful care and the skill of the doctors at Walter Reed. I think he will be, in himself, a great source of encouragement to the men with whom he will work.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL