My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Yesterday Miss Thompson and I came to New York City and in the evening I went out to Rockville Center, L.I., to speak at a meeting. This is, of course, a rock-ribbed Republican area, but there seemed to be a few Democrats, since the hall was filled and there was a crowd outside. In fact, one speaker made the remark that the reason the Democratic party has not grown in Nassau County was that the Republicans would never build a hall big enough for all of them to meet.

I got back rather late, and began my morning appointments at 9 o'clock. There were a few other appointments throughout the day and the usual mail had to be attended to.

As I rode downtown in a taxicab, my driver entertained me greatly by making grave political observations really worthy of some of our best politicos! Looking straight ahead, he suddenly said: "It will either be a landslide for the President which will carry everyone else with him, or it will be a landslide the other way and we will be completely Republican!" I burst out laughing, because it sounded like so many of the prophecies and polls which are constantly being quoted. The only answer I could think of was: "Well, I imagine we have to wait until the votes are counted on Election Day."

Now that Holland is gradually being liberated, one of the things which many of us were interested in before the war will assume even greater importance. Before the war, the Netherlands-America Foundation, in collaboration with the Amsterdam Chamber of Commerce and The Hague, had established a fund large enough to exchange five students a year, and the University of Leyden, during its summer session, conducted a one week's course in Dutch civilization for American students.

It is hoped that this beginning in good cultural relationships between the two countries will become more active in the postwar period. On December 5, the foundation is giving a concert at the Metropolitan Opera House for the Hendrik Willem Van Loon scholarship fund. The money raised will go to support the interchange of Netherland and American students, and the concert will pay special tribute to the courage of the Dutch people. The Dutch conductor, Dr. Hans Kindler, will bring the National Symphony Orchestra from Washington for this occasion, and the soloists will be Helen Traubel, Metropolitan soprano, and Egon Petri, pianist. It will be a great occasion, and a cause in which I hope we will all be interested.

E.R.
PNews, NSJ, 5 November 1944