My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Yesterday afternoon we were back in Hyde Park, and it certainly was a joy to plunge into what is a pretty cold pool after all the cool weather we have had. To my surprise, I found that two of our young guests had learned to dive while I was gone. I wish we older people learned things like that as quickly as the young ones do.

For the last time, yesterday evening, the entertainers sent by the United Theatre War Activities Committee came up for the canteen, and we went down to the little boat house, where they played to a most appreciative audience. I enjoyed Eric Victor and his accompanist, Miss Evelyn Hurwitz, very much. I was not sure how the boys would receive his interpretative dancing, but I soon found that the excellence of his performance held their attention every minute.

Miss Ruth Winchell played the accordion, and it sounded like an organ. At the end, she got the whole group singing with her in the songs they know the best, and I think it was one of the most successful evenings they have had this summer. They hope to continue running the canteen through the rest of the autumn and winter. But since I can't be sure of being here every Wednesday, my share of entertaining the entertainers had to end last night.

Someone has sent me two rather interesting articles. One is a Reader's Digest reprint from Common Sense. It is called "The Army Saves Its Black Sheep," by Don Wharton, and if you have not read it I hope you will do so. It is one of the most encouraging things I have read, and a program for which the army should receive great praise. In this program, they take men who, for one reason or another, have committed intermediate offenses—such as being AWOL for a long period of time. They study their background, and instead of giving them a dishonorable discharge, give them a chance for rehabilitation. Many of them have gone back and accomplished valuable service.

The other article was written by John Newton Baker for Read Magazine, on the work of the League of Women Voters. It brings out what this group of women really have accomplished and are trying to accomplish, and I think is one of the best articles I have read on their work.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL