My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Now that I am back at Hyde Park, I should like to add some of the details of my visit to Lake Junaluska, which is not very far from Asheville, in North Carolina.

Anyone familiar with that country knows that it is very beautiful and the climate delightful, but it is the atmosphere of the whole colony which pleased me. The first thing you see, on a high spot in the grounds, is a great cross which at night is illuminated. They told me that originally, when the cross had been built, the intention was to light it up only during the summer when the conferences were in session. But the railroad men, who can see it as they pass in the night, grew so fond of it that when it was turned off they sent a petition to the board asking that it be lit every night, for it gave them food for thought and inspiration as they drove their engines into the dark.

Of course, I saw more of Mrs. M. E. Tilly, and the various women who are secretaries of the various departments, than of any other people. I liked everyone I met and was grateful to all for their kindness.

I reached Asheville about 9:30 in the morning of July 25th. I went at once to the recruiting center for the WACs, and from there for an interview at the local radio station. I enjoyed every minute of the beautiful drive to Lake Junaluska, and the first glimpse of the lake as we came along the mountain road is a sight long to be remembered.

I had time to change for lunch with Mr. and Mrs. William F. Quillian. Afterwards some 30 or 40 women were invited in, and I answered some questions which Mrs. Maud M. Turpin, the public relations secretary, had prepared for this particular group. After another short rest, we started out to see all the points of interest. At the colored center I said a few words, and they sang for me. The Woman's Club also was holding a meeting, where we were welcomed and then taken for a short boat ride on the lake. Dr. Lamberth insisted that we must at least have ten minutes on the water, and during those minutes, the children who had crowded aboard were busy having their autograph books signed. Then supper and the big evening meeting in the auditorium.

At a quarter before 8, the following morning, we went over to Waynesboro, where the Chamber of Commerce gave a most delightful breakfast at the country club. Mrs. Charles Tillett, our chairman of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee, came over with her daughter and attended most of these meetings. She looked as charming and as fresh as though she had not just returned from attending the national convention. After the breakfast, several of the seminars joined together in a forum at which I spoke. I had time to pack and dress, attend a last luncheon and say a few words of good-bye to all of the kind ladies who made my visit so enjoyable.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL