My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—The all-day meeting which was held here yesterday, I felt accomplished its objective. The organizations represented agreed that they would build up a roster of available women in various fields and this roster would be made obtainable to government officials. They decided to appoint national and international committees which will now, and in the future, present and consider postwar problems. This ought to be of real value and the by-product may be a greater interest on the part of women in other women who may be qualified either as experts in some particular line, or as policy-making people because of the breadth of their general interest and knowledge.

Last evening I went to the Women's National Press Club dinner where Mrs. Elizabeth May Craig turned over the presidency of the club for the coming year to Miss Edith Gaylord.

There is a nice little ceremony which takes place at these annual dinners when the president, who has enjoyed the use of a lovely silver bowl which was given to the club some years ago by Cora Rigby, turns the bowl over to the incoming president and receives in its place a copy which she herself retains. This year, owing to the war, it was impossible to give a duplicate of the bowl, but another old silver piece was found and will remain one of Mrs. Craig's most treasured possessions, I am sure.

The speaker of the evening was Mr. George E. Sterling of the Federal Communications Commission in charge of what might be called the FBI Service of the Air, who gave us an interesting and instructive talk. I realized again that every occupation has its own vocabulary. And I hope that other people were more familiar with some of the words which Mr. Sterling used than I was.

Today I had some people lunch with me and some more people are coming in for tea and dinner. Tonight I am off for a long weekend in the country.

I find that in praising "The Twin City Homemakers Section of the American Home Economics Association," I only mentioned their interest in the extension of the Price Control Act to check inflation, and I did not mention one thing which they feel is most important and which I am glad to add, because I think a great many women are also interested in it. These homemakers want to see quality of all goods tied to the price by a thorough program of grade labeling and standardization. They have carried on a great deal of discussion in their group on this subject, and they are convinced that now is the time for the OPA to educate people along these lines as without this provision they do not feel one hundred percent effectiveness can be obtained. I entirely agree that there should be honest labeling and standardizing of all goods on the market, but I think perhaps at the present time we have so many things to think about, that it would be difficult to get a thorough study and understanding of this question.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL