My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—I had no intention in my column published on Monday the 22nd, of stating that men were suddenly giving up their vote this year, but in some way the word "many" was left out of the copy. What I meant to say, of course, was that "many men" this year, because of war conditions, are not going to be able to vote. This includes men whose work has taken them to new places and who cannot qualify for either absentee ballots in the old place of residence or under the rules in their new place of residence. Secondly, many men at the front, for one reason or another, will not be able to comply with state regulations and get their ballots in on time.

I travelled to Baltimore, Md. and back to New York on Sunday because long ago I made an engagement to speak at a meeting of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, when I thought I would be in Washington and could just stop over on my way to New York City. Spending so many hours on trains gives me a chance to do a considerable amount of reading. If you want to spend an amusing half hour, I suggest you read a little book called: "While Father is Away." The child is a very real child and will give you many smiles, even if a tear may be rather close at hand now and then.

On Monday in New York City, I went to the lunch for the American Women's Voluntary Services, at which they launched their nationwide campaign for clothes conservation. The Mayor of New York City and the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Forrestal, both spoke extremely well, and for an audience of ladies, perhaps the greatest interest centered in the fashion show which was put on by Mrs. June Hamilton Rhodes.

A charming looking woman in an AWVS uniform walked out first for inspection, carrying a large, blown up photograph of the garment as it originally looked when it came into the shop. Then followed a lovely young thing in the garment which had been made over by a well known designer, and she, in turn, was followed by another lovely young thing in a garment made in one of the other AWVS shops from the same design, but out of material which someone in that particular locality had brought in.

The most charming groups, of course, were the little children who acted as models in a most professional manner, and seemed not at all disturbed by photographers' bulbs flashing and people applauding as they walked the length of the built-up platform.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL