My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—At one-thirty Sunday afternoon, I went to the New School for Social Research to speak at a luncheon meeting held jointly by the International Student Assembly and the United States Student Assembly. Both organizations have held very successful two day conventions and were closing in the afternoon.

The International Student Assembly was formed a year ago last September at a meeting in Washington, held under the auspices of the United States branch of the International Student Service. Later, the International Student Service, while retaining a skeleton organization, gave up its work, feeling that too many young people would be in the armed forces to make working with them as students feasible or important. The young people themselves seemed to feel differently, and the International group continued to work. Delegates were sent from foreign countries to study here in various schools and colleges and to work with the International Student Assembly.

The United States Student Assembly which also decided to continue working in this country, has made some rather notable advances. Most important, I think, is the way the young people, with very limited assistance from a few older people, have increased participation in college groups. They have held several interesting meetings at which they obtained good speakers, and from which the young people have gained valuable knowledge and inspiration. The great advantage in work of this kind is the experience in organization, and the concern which is developed for questions affecting the well being of the students' own country and the various other countries of the world.

I think the two organizations have been very successful in doing this, and they deserve much credit, for they have done it with little outside help.

Last night I had a delightful time with the members of the Graduate Club of Teachers College. I spent a few very pleasant minutes with Dean and Mrs. Russell first, seeing the pictures of their grandchild, in whom I have a special interest. I have been interested in the young mother, the former Miss Jane Seaver, ever since I first met her at Mount Holyoke College. Then we went to the Graduate Club for the coffee hour, and finally to the Horace Mann school auditorium where I heard two delightful musical selections before speaking.

It seems appropriate while I am in New York to mention the fact that on April 18, the 1944 drive was started to raise $4,500,000 for the Greater New York Fund. This money is distributed among 403 voluntary hospitals, health and welfare agencies in New York City, and as usual I am sure it has had wholehearted support.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL