My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—Yesterday was a busy day because, as usual, there seemed to be plenty of work waiting on our desks when we came in. Some young people came to lunch. Among them was Sergeant John Carey, a member of a Marine Corps dive bomber crew, who is back here on furlough after many months in the Pacific. I noted four stars on his service ribbon, but he was as modest as could be and glowed with pride over the achievements of his older brother, Mr. James B. Carey, secretary-treasurer of the CIO. It was a kind of mutual admiration society which was pleasant to see.

At two-thirty I went out to Walter Reed Hospital to attend a discussion group meeting which has been started out there by the patients. Mrs. Bradley Dewey, wife of the rubber director, is in charge. Those who are in bed in the wards can listen over the loud speaker connections and they can send in questions. These were of a general nature and covered many subjects yesterday, but I think that as they go on, they will find it necessary to take up one or two subjects each day, and will have people there who know those particular subjects very well.

I found myself promising to look certain questions up and get detailed answers for the meeting next Thursday. I am happy to see this being done in the hospitals, because in hospitals men have time to think about the problems of the future, and that is where they should also be able to obtain exact information on any points affecting them personally.

Last night I went to the final meeting of the Inter-American Commission of Women at the Pan-American Union Building. It was an interesting meeting and one which showed very clearly that the women of the Americas can work together and accomplish real results. All those who had attended the conferences felt that women should be included in the groups now making plans for the future. If that does happen, I know there will be an increasing flow of information to the women of our various countries which will heighten our mutual sense of responsibility for the future.

I am interested to find that St. Louis University is now sponsoring an activity which may be of interest to a number of people who are completely home-bound. The university departments of marketing and the school of commerce and finance have set up as a permanent activity, the checking of radio programs by home-bound people throughout this country. After the war, it is hoped to make this a worldwide operation. An activity of this kind should give work and interest to handicapped people and should mean an improvement in radio programs in regard to accuracy and presentation.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL