My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday —With me on the Grandmothers War Bond League broadcast for the Treasury Department on Monday, were three very interesting grandmothers, as you may have gathered. As I looked at Mrs. Low, the Chinese grandmother, I could not help marvelling at her ability to go from door to door selling bonds each day, for she is surely well over 70. The other two were very young grandmothers, and I feel sure they will put many of us to shame by their activity for quite a while.

While we are talking about bonds, I must tell you that I have had some questions lately that I think are worthy of your consideration.

One of my correspondents says that he thinks it would be an encouraging thing for our boys overseas if, instead of telling them about the difficulties of rationing and wartime economies, we sang the praises of the extraordinary achievements in selling bonds. If we told them about the people in the neighborhood who are working and buying bonds, it would give the boys a sense of pride and satisfaction in their own communities. They might even have a greater feeling of security in their futures, because they would realize that the people at home were really thinking about them and their welfare when they bought bonds.

While I was in New York City, I had hoped to see a play called "Mrs. January and Mr. X," but that proved impossible so I look forward to seeing it at some later time. However, I did see a preview of a new play which Mr. John Golden is producing called: "But Not Goodbye." One of the people with me enjoyed the play very much and kept saying: "I like it because I think I might almost have written it myself," which was a tribute to the reality and naturalness of the situations. The fact that the characters were real people whom you might see in any one of our hometowns deepened this impression. The idea is original, if somewhat uncomfortable to contemplate, and I think you will spend an amusing evening and take away much food for thought!

In New York City I was also presented with a batch of doughnuts by the Camp Fire Girls, which they are selling for their annual fund raising campaign. I hope everybody will be doughnut conscious this week, for the little girls told me that each one of them had to sell 40 dozen, which is quite an obligation for a youngster!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL