My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—Have I said anything to you before about the fact that this year is the centennial year for the YMCA? Twelve young men started this organization in a hall bedroom and now there are 10,000 associations in 68 countries. In our own country today, 1200 associations with more than 10,000,000 members are participating in serving the Armed Forces in addition to maintaining their regular program.

The success of this association means that when you try to translate your religion into action in daily life, it has a great appeal for young people.

The United Council of Church Women is also trying to do some work that will require year round daily thinking and action. They have decided to observe "World Community Day" annually.

Mrs. Emory Ross, a vice-president of the United Council, said in a release to the press: "Out of the observance, has come a determination of church women all over the nation to continue to study the price of an enduring peace. The continued study by thousands of church women is a hopeful outlook. We look forward to observing this day annually, and through preparation for it and study classes after it, we are keeping Christian women constantly alert to international problems and spurring them to action to help solve them."

This again is bringing the influence of religion to bear on the citizenship of all people. I hope it may lead many women to feel that it is a religious duty to take responsibility for the attitude of their government.

Yesterday the eighth annual report of the Social Security Board of the Federal Security Agency was issued. I hope that every person reading it will think of it in connection with our economic bill of rights for America, as described in the President's message last Tuesday. The Board urges a complete, unified social insurance system, providing to all people who work, protection against the "economic hazards besetting the long road of self-support and family support which is arduous and risky for most in any working generation."

About 20,000,000 workers are not yet covered by social insurance because of the restrictions in the existing program. These include farm workers and domestic workers, self employed, employees of federal, state and local government, employees of non-profit organizations, maritime workers and many employees of small firms. Tomorrow I would like to point out where the board feels the program is insufficiently developed.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL