My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday —On Saturday I spoke at a luncheon of the Wellesley Club and found myself sitting beside Captain Mildred McAfee, which is always a joy. In the afternoon I received the new ambassador of the Dominican Republic and his wife and daughter, and the new minister of Ethiopia. Later there were a number of guests at tea.

Just the people in the house made it quite a gay party of young people, so we had only one or two boys in the service who happened to be in Washington as our guests from outside.

Sunday was a rather quiet day. There were only one or two people at lunch. I took the midnight train to New York City.

Today I am attending the birthday lunch for Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt. I have often wanted to go before, but this is the first time in some years that I will succeed in being present. Mrs. Catt has always been one of the people whom I have greatly admired. I feel great pride in her many achievements. She still keeps her interest in what goes on in the world and her power to be of value to young people. As I grow older I realize how remarkable it is to remain flexible and to be able to make a contribution in the discussion of new problems.

I am very happy to find that the Women's City Club in New York City, which now has its headquarters in the New Weston Hotel, is making the club facilities available to the wives of servicemen who are temporarily in New York. The club is keeping someone on hand to receive these young women. They come from all over the country to say goodbye to their husbands, or to await the arrival of their husbands from overseas, or to visit them in nearby hospitals. Sometimes they are without friends and so they enjoy finding someone at the club who will give them the information they need and tell them what services are available in New York City. Then too, they can rest and have tea in surroundings which are so much pleasanter than those in an overcrowded hotel.

I am happy to think that in this crisis, the Women's City Club is doing this. I have always felt that the civic work of the club was very important, both because of its educational value for the members of the club, who do the work, and because of the influence the members can bring to bear on the city government. For that reason I have kept my membership during all these years that I have been away. I hope that if I am ever able to spend some of my time regularly in New York City, I may again join in some of their activities.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL