My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—On Monday, October 11th, at the St. George Hotel in Brooklyn, N. Y., Youth Aliyah, a young group working under Hadassah, will start a fund raising campaign to help the young Jewish people of Europe. All of us know what the horrors of persecution have done to the Jewish people in the last few years throughout Europe, and I think it is well that young people of every faith and of every race, should join together to help save other people from suffering if they can.

There are many kinds of suffering which these young people have been through. It is obvious that years of starvation and hardship have taken a toll in physical health. We must try to learn about diets and provide the best possible food for these children in the years to come.

But there is also a scarring of the mind and of the spirit, and that is harder to heal in youth than physical defects. In the future, the results of this suffering will have to be met by understanding as young people meet throughout the world. This is a fundraising campaign which Youth Aliyah is starting, but we hope that it also be a campaign which will create greater understanding among youth for the future.

I have a postcard which asks me to advise some appropriate things to put in a Christmas box going to a young man in the Army in England. England can be a cold place through the winter months, and I think wool socks, handkerchiefs, chocolate candy, a hot water bag, (if you can find one, or have one to spare) small paper covered editions of books or recent small magazines, and writing paper, might be very acceptable.

I suppose the suggestion of a hot water bag sounds very "sissy" for a soldier, but I assure you he would find it pleasant. In any case, he can exchange it, or give it to anyone who has been kind to him in England, for one cannot buy a hot water bag there. When we were there a year ago, Miss Thompson and I each had one and left them behind for friends, by request.

It has turned cold up here. Yesterday, however was warm enough for an out-of-door picnic. The colors at this season and the whole countryside are still lovely. The sun, when it is out, is still warm enough to make sitting in it very pleasant and not too hot. Some friends were with us for our picnic, among them a young Marine, who was wounded in the early fighting on Guadalcanal. He is only a boy, nineteen-and-a-half, but he has many decorations and I think his family must be very proud of his record.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL