My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Wednesday—Monday afternoon I met at Greenwich House with a group of thirty to forty young college students, who are working this summer in New York City settlement houses. There is a great scarcity of social workers and these young people are getting some training in social work in connection with courses they are taking in college.

Some of the group had been up in Harlem the night before and knew something of the sudden hysteria which swept this small area. They, of course, wanted to discuss it, but I knew too little about it.

I am quite sure these summer months will be of material value in broadening their views of the problems of a great city and a great nation, where the social sciences have lagged behind the industrial and scientific development.

In the evening I went to a meeting sponsored by the United States Student Assembly, at Hunter College, Park Avenue and 68th Street. The Austrian students' declaration and their courage in defying the Nazi rulers has made a profound impression on the student world in this country and I hope that it will move them to participate actively in their own citizenship.

Talking and meeting accomplishes little, but real participation in the local groups of their communities will make our young people as potent a force in the building of public opinion here as student groups today are in other countries of the world.

I ended up the evening in Monday by going to the Martin Beck Theatre, where "The Army Play By Play" is running. Mr. John Golden asked me to come, since it was the opening night at popular prices and he wanted me to wish the boys good luck. I think they must be a little tired of seeing me at their performances, but I was glad to be with them this last time and to tell them that my interest was not only in them as soldiers, but in all young people and in the work which they do.

I hope that "The Army Play By Play" will have a very successful run since the prices are the ordinary theatre prices. I am quite sure that everyone who sees these plays will come away having had not only an amusing evening, but a feeling that they have learned something about the boys and the life as the boys see it in our Army.

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of seeing Miss Helen Ferris, of the Junior Literary Guild, who came to talk over some of their spring choices of books. She is always a joy to talk to, and I am always anxious to hear about my fellow members on the board of judges, since I consider Mr. Angelo Patri and Mrs. Sidonie Gruenberg much better judges than I am. Therefore, they are always of interest to me.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL