My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—I was back in Washington Friday morning and spent the day seeing people, some of them for purely social reasons, and some of them on business. It always surprises me how one can fill a day with appointments fifteen minutes to a half hour in length, and apparently never see all those who wish to see you.

Last night we saw the picture "Mission To Moscow," which has excited so much comment among various people. It is interesting to me primarily because of the journey which Ambassador Davies took to the various parts of Russia. That journey explains to me the ability of the Russians to stand up against the Germans.

They were far more developed along many lines of industry than I had realized. Nor had I sensed the fact that they were so conscious of the danger of the war that they had prepared themselves to move machinery and men in their war industries to other locations, if the fortunes of war made it necessary.

Today the page boys at the Capitol, who were my guests earlier in the winter, are coming for a picnic lunch in the White House garden. I am very happy to have these boys because I do not think their lives are particularly easy. It is a great opportunity for them to serve the Government and to come in contact with outstanding figures in the country. On the other hand, it is not entirely a normal existence for their age, and I do not think all of them find it an easy adjustment.

The other night, when I attended the War Workers' Canteen, a a song was sung called "I Am On My Way," written by Mrs. Stuart C. Godfrey. General and Mrs. Godfrey have written and published a song called "The U. S. Engineers Fight Song." Mrs. Godfrey is the founder of an organization called: "Music For The Services," which has really done a great deal of work.

The object is to supply army camp and navy base recreation rooms with instruments, records and sheet music. Among the contributions already made are 60 pianos, 60 phonographs, 4,600 records, 8,000 items of sheet music and many instruments. Music is essential and one of the greatest morale building forces in the services, and I hope Mrs. Godfrey will have the support of many music loving people in her work.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL