My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LOS ANGELES, Tuesday—Last Saturday morning, we reached Deming, New Mexico, after an overnight train trip from Phoenix, Arizona. We deposited our bags at the Park Hotel, which I remembered from a previous trip with my husband.

This small town hasn't changed much in twenty years. We wandered down the street and went into a little restaurant for our morning coffee and the pleasure of shaking hands and talking briefly with a number of citizens. I only wish I could have seen more people in Deming, for I know how many anxious hearts there must be waiting even now to have final news of those they cared about, who took part in the fighting on Bataan and Corregidor.

Right after breakfast, I went to the bombardier training school and spent the morning seeing the post with General Scanlon and Colonel Milton Murphy. They were both kind and showed me many things of great interest. The Colonel has made a great effort to keep down the dust and sand, which is one of the great drawbacks in all these desert camps. Flying conditions are practically always good in these parts and very few days are lost, which is a great advantage in the training period.

After lunch, a young friend of mine, who is stationed here, drove us to E1 Paso, Texas. He and another friend, now in the Civil Air Patrol, had dinner with us and we made an early evening plane and arrived in Los Angeles around 1:00 a.m.

Easter Sunday was spent very quietly. It has been a pleasure to see our son Jimmy's wife, and a number of old friends who are living here. On Monday morning we started off to visit the hospitals in the vicinity, which I came to see.

Corona, the first hospital visited on Monday morning, was once a health and pleasure resort. The grounds have been well landscaped and, as you go in, you think you are in an attractive hotel, which must be a pleasant atmosphere for the convalescent boys. There is an indoor swimming pool and individual baths, where the patients can have the benefit of hot sulphur water.

I should think there are great possibilities for therapeutic treatment of all kinds. There are under 700 patients here at present, but a complete tuberculosis hospital will soon be completed and there is plenty of room for expansion.

Long Beach is a permanent hospital, well planned and pleasant and airy on the inside. Since it is new, the grounds are not yet completely planted and there is no mistaking that it is an institution. Here also the men are evidently getting excellent care. In both hospitals the spirit of courage and confidence to meet the future seems to be instilled by the staff.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL