My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—Here we are back in New York City, and my last column has not told you about Wednesday evening in San Francisco! Johnny and Anne, joined Miss Thompson and me, and we went to a well known restaurant called the Omar Khayyam. This is noted for Armenian food, and the owner and chef came out to tell us he was going to serve us a real Armenian dinner.

We had two kinds of Armenian bread and liked everything and ate everything which was put before us. The chef thinks rationing is not only easy to live up to, but will be extremely good for us as housewives. We shall, he believes, use our ingenuity and find a truly American cuisine by combining all the different cuisines which have come to us from all the different nationalities of the world. It will be developed not by chefs, but by housewives who will grow to love and prefer their kitchens and own creations to the tin can and can opener of the past.

Afterwards, we went to see Miss Mayris Chaney and her two partners dance, and heard the leader of the band, Mr. Hershey Martin, do a most remarkable drum solo.

Yesterday morning, Mr. Duffy, the warden of San Quentin prison, came with Mrs. Duffy to call for me. I was given an opportunity to see some of the war industries carried on in that prison, which was one of the first in the country to obtain government work.

The prison has developed an interest in this work among the prisoners and is achieving an enviable record of production. The inmates receive no pay in California, but out of the money sent them by friends and relatives for tobacco and extra food, they have bought $130,000 worth of war bonds.

Back at the naval base, Johnny and his chief, Captain Arthur H. Mayo, showed us over the storage of supplies for the Navy at this particular point. They have a coffee roasting plant and everything needed on ship or shore. We lunched with Captain and Mrs. Mayo and left by plane in the afternoon and arrived in New York City in time for a rest before we tackled some of our neglected work in the shape of a small mountain of mail.

I have a letter from Philadelphia, calling my attention to one of the activities of the Women's Division of the War Savings Staff, which permits a particular organization the privilege of naming either a medium size bomber or a Flying Fortress, if they succeed in selling a sufficient number of Series E Bonds during their campaign.

The students, faculty, staff and alumni of Girard College are conducting such a campaign at the present time and expect to name a bomber "Stephen Girard." Born in France, he was a very patriotic American who gave much of his own money to the government in 1814 and endowed this college.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL