My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PORTLAND, Ore., Monday—Friday evening I attended the Women's War Savings League Bond Rally and spoke to a crowded house. They presented certificates of merit to about 75 women, who represented their industrial plants which had agreed to the 10 percent pay roll deduction. Some plants had 100 percent of contributors, but all of them at least ninety percent.

A reception was held afterwards, to which I think most of the audience came. The very charming wife of the Governor, Mrs. Arthur Langlie, introduced me and, with the other members of the committee, stood in line to receive the guests at the reception.

In the states of Washington and Oregon, they are carrying on classes to acquaint people with the value of buying bonds, and the reasons why people should be saving at the present time, but I am wondering whether talks are also being given to women on other subjects which might be helpful to them.

I have had a report from New York City which tells me that, at Hunter College, they are giving a series of six lectures at which they have speakers from the War Manpower Commission, the Vocational Department of the Board of Education, the U.S. Employment Service, the New York State Board of Mediation and the State Department of Labor.

These talks are designed to acquaint women with the needs and opportunities for them in industry, with the background of the labor union and its place in the plant; with the importance of safety measures, proper clothing, diet and health habits under new responsibilities. They also give them the information on community facilities available to women on meeting their child care and household problems, and they tell them of the state and national labor laws affecting women in industry.

Of course, this is primarily valuable for women who have not worked before, or who are changing their present employment for employment more essential to the war effort. It seems to me a very helpful service. I should like to see added to it some discussion of the underlying reasons for fighting the war and the postwar problems we face together.

Saturday, we visited some of the soldiers manning defense stations in the Seattle area, and later the naval clinic where many Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guardsmen receive care for minor ailments and where their families can also be given medical attention.

A young friend, who is studying at the college at Pullman, Washington, arrived in the afternoon to spend the night. Early this morning we left for Portland, Oregon.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL