My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAYBROOK, Conn., Tuesday—Yesterday I had the pleasure of meeting all the ladies of the Cabinet at luncheon. We discussed some of the activities, or rather the curtailment of activities, in the social life of this extremely busy city. That took a rather small amount of time and so we found ourselves able to talk about many of the happenings of the day in the world at large. How avid we all are for war news, and how anxious we women are to feel that good news today means the war will not last long.

In the afternoon, Dean Grayson N. Kefauver, of Stanford University, came to see me about a proposal for the establishment of a joint commission of education in democratic societies, which he, Sir Ernest Simon and others are now discussing. It is a most interesting subject, and one which I think will take a good deal of thought in the development.

The President of Ecuador and his son spent the night with us. They arrived by air in time for tea. The President gave an official stag dinner in the evening and I attended a concert at Bolling Field. They are having a series of concerts and I had agreed, before I went away, to go as soon as possible and was very happy that I could do so last night.

I took the night train to New York City and the 9:00 a.m. train to Saybrook, Conn., to see my friends Miss Lape and Miss Read, before fulfilling a long—postponed engagement at Connecticut College.

On Saturday last, the first USO center in the United States for servicewomen of the United Nations was formally opened in Detroit Michigan. The WAACS have a USO center in Des Moines, Iowa, but the one in Detroit is international because the Canadian servicewomen often spend their 48 hour weekend in Detroit. Of course, all the branches of military service in which women are now serving, will use this center, and the YWCA is very proud that their central branch building has been chosen to be the home of this new activity.

They tell me, with a great deal of pride, that this USO center will have everything which the men's USO center has, plus a few feminine touches, such as a laundry, attractive curtains and bedspread in the rooms. The women directing this new center have had a great deal of experience, both in military circles and in war and peacetime work with the YWCA, and I look forward to having an opportunity to see this club the first time I am able to go to Detroit.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL