My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Tuesday—Last Sunday, my daughter and son-in-law, with the two older children went with me to Bremerton. After a very pleasant luncheon with Mrs. Taffinder, wife of Admiral Sherwoode Ayerst Taffinder, Commandant of the Navy Yard, we visited the hospital with Captain Dan Hunt. This is not as big a hospital as those in San Francisco or San Diego, but it has been somewhat enlarged lately.

There were a number of patients from the northern area, not all of them, however, from the battlefront. A good many boys get hurt on board ship. In all these hospitals there are a number of nervous cases, some of whom, perhaps, will never be able to resume work in the armed forces, but may be able to take up their civilian occupations again.

They have some wards for the care of Navy dependents, and I saw a number of wives whose husbands are off on foreign duty. Seven babies were in the nursery, and several children were recovering from more or less serious illnesses.

This is not a separate hospital building, as it was at the naval air station in San Diego, but is a part of the regular hospital. The patients pay $3.50 a day, just as they do in San Diego. I had not been at this navy yard since the President was Assistant Secretary of the Navy. We visited all the navy yards on this coast in the winter of 1914, and the change is simply breathtaking. What used to be a golf course is now covered with shops and great activity is going on everywhere.

Yesterday, at noon, I spoke here in Victory Square. Ever since last May, Seattle has carried on noonday meetings in Victory Square. Always they have a record of bond sales read. In addition, they make a point of bringing interesting people to talk at that hour on anything to do with the war effort.

Yesterday, an army band, belonging to a Washington, D. C., regiment, played very well. In compliance with Donald Nelson's request, the newspapers here, as well as in other parts of the country, are responsible for the scrap metal drive, and they had charge of yesterday's program.

To me, the most interesting part of the program was the interviewing of four young officers; two naval fliers back from the Aleutian Islands and two boys from the Lexington. All of their stories were interesting, though told with great understatement, because the boys seemed much embarrassed at having to talk about their own experiences.

In the afternoon, my daughter and I saw a picture which was taken in China by Mr. Mark L. Moody, an American businessman who has spent some 25 years in the Far East. He had exceptional opportunities for taking pictures when the Japanese took Shanghai and various nearby cities.

The film is called "Ravaged Earth," and he tells me his desire is to awaken the people in this country to a knowledge of the kind of adversary they have in the Japanese. They are certainly appalling pictures. If we need any awakening, this film should certainly open our eyes.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL