My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—Washington continues to treat us to a warm, muggy weather, which makes us long for a real brisk autumn day. In the meantime, we realize that before long we shall look back to the nice lazy feeling we have at present and wonder how we could find time to sit in a chair to read a book, just because the air seemed heavy and we did not feel like moving around.

After writing my column yesterday, I began to think about how people, who have never been in public life, little know about the everyday things involved in living not as one chooses, but as one must.

Those of us who have lived in government houses know that no government house is ever our own, nor is it ever a home. For instance, I love the White House. It is a simple, dignified and beautiful government building. I take great pride in it, but it is not that intimate, personal thing—"my own home."

I am always glad to see my children in the White House, because unless I did, I would often miss opportunities of seeing them. But it is at home, in our own house, in our own surroundings, that I really like to welcome them; for that is ours and we have an obligation only to our family and our own friends there.

It is a curious thing which is often stressed in electing a man to office in this country, we, naturally, do not elect his wife nor his children to office. Yet some people think that there is something very glamorous and much to be envied in this rather anomalous position, where you have certain responsibilities, pleasures and privileges imposed upon you through somebody else's position.

You may find a woman living in the White House who has no interest in public affairs, and yet, willy-nilly, she must live there and she must entertain very often, for no reason except that her husband is in public office.

Many a shy and retiring child, I am sure, has suffered from being pointed out as the child of a President, or even the grandchild. No one will deny that there are great opportunities. To be the relative of a man in public life is useful in assisting those throughout the United States who need help, and it is also useful in meeting people of outstanding interest. Nevertheless, there are a considerable number of drawbacks.

Last night I left Washington at midnight to come up to New York City for a meeting of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children. A little later, I expect to go to Philadelphia to see "Youth City." I shall tell you more about it tomorrow.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL