My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—Yesterday I worked with a group of foreign students on a broadcast which we gave last evening, and from the studio we went to the auditorium. Mr. William Batt and I spoke, and Dr. Frank Graham, President of the University of North Carolina, was chairman of this session of the "The People's Century."

The questions after our talks were equally divided between Dr. Batt and myself. A few were directed at Dr. Graham. They were all pertinent and challenging questions, and I only hope that we were able to give something of value to these young people from some 53 nations of the world.

The Canadian delegation to the assembly had breakfast with me this morning and stayed afterwards for a talk, in which Dr. Alvin Johnson joined. Today the executive committee of the International Student Service met at lunch, and there are panels and round table discussions during both morning and afternoon for the delegates.

I have been to a great many conferences, both of older people and younger people, in the course of a long life. However, I am impressed by the earnestness of everyone in attendance here, and also by the ability with which the conference has been run. When you get so many people together, there is bound to be some confusion, but I think at this conference it has been kept at a minimum.

I was very sorry not to be able to go to New York City today to attend a meeting of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children. There is going to be an opportunity for us in this country to show our concern for the suffering of children in Europe. It should be possible to bring some children over here, whose parents are in concentration camps, or who themselves have been interned, I think our committee should make every effort to raise the necessary money.

This younger generation is paying in many cases, for the sins of its elders. I feel very strongly that the world is going to need these children, who certainly will have a realization of what the loss of the brotherhood of man can mean to a generation.

When the women state chairmen, who are accepting the responsibility of helping to sell war stamps and bonds throughout this country, were here for lunch the other day, they brought me a number of those corsage bouquets made of stamps. Each state has tried to develop something distinctive to represent the state. In many instances they are really charming bouquets which have far greater permanence than the flowers which used to be presented to young ladies.

The state of Washington seems to have a particularly attractive one. The different shades of brown will tone in well with autumn colors. Anywhere in the country now, we can buy these little stamp bouquets and they are a pleasant method of investment.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL