My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—Yesterday was such a clear and beautiful day that we went to the top of the hill back of my cottage for a picnic on the porch of the President's little cottage. He has had vistas cut, so that as you sit on his porch, if the weather is clear, you can see the Catskill mountains to the north and straight down across the Hudson River.

By walking a very short distance from the highest point of all, one can get a view of the foothills of the Berkshires and the Shawangunk range to the south.

We all enjoyed ourselves, except the poor cat. She had to be shut up because she went after a little dog we had with us who was completely intimidated by her. Fortunately, as we left, I remembered she must be given her freedom and the closet door was opened.

In the late afternoon I had to meet a train, and then go to the library for the opening of an exhibition of "Paintings of Dutchess County," by members of the Dutchess County Art Association. It was a very well attended party.

The Association had chosen eleven winning pictures, which are to be photographed for a calendar. The twelfth is to be chosen by the public, so everybody was asked to vote and the voting will continue till the close of the exhibition at the end of this month.

This morning Miss Thompson and I are going to New York City. After speaking at Teachers College, Columbia University, tonight, I shall take the night train to Washington.

I have a letter from Mrs. Nathan Straus of the American Women's Voluntary Services, asking me if I would not remind women everywhere in the country that they should take a home nursing course.

There are two reasons for this. Wherever possible, people with minor ailments should be cared for at home, because hospital facilities at present are being taxed to the utmost. Their resources are being so largely drawn upon, that hospital care must of necessity be limited.

Secondly, people who must go to hospitals will be returned as convalescents sooner than usual and more knowledge of home nursing is necessary. The volunteer nurses aides are being trained by the hospitals, but of course, only take this training if willing to give the required number of hours of service in the hospital afterwards.

In all probability, you should be willing to serve for the duration of the war. Naturally, this is not possible for women who have home responsibilities, especially young children or older people to be cared for in the home.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL