My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—On Friday night I again took some young Navy men to see the show, "This Is The Army." There are not many shows you can see a second time, and enjoy them as much as the first time. But I can honestly say in this case, that I had a good time myself, which was enhanced by watching my guests enjoy themselves.

On Saturday morning, I left the train at Beacon, N. Y., so as to have a swim and lunch with Secretary and Mrs. Morgenthau. I was home by three o'clock, and we had quite a number of guests for supper at my cottage. Today there are guests again for lunch and supper, but on the whole, the day is a quiet day, which the gray sky perhaps accentuates. Not even a leaf is stirring outside of our windows now, and the purple fire-weed along our brook, which I have always loved, is reflected in the water as in a looking-glass, for not a ripple is stirring.

When I awakened this morning, the sky was blue, and the birds were chirping everywhere, but now it looks as though Nature were waiting for the rain to come, or for the wind to blow.

I have just received an appeal from the Greek War Relief Association. They have finally been authorized to send food to Greece in larger amounts than has been permitted heretofore. They need money, and they will need it continuously, as long as it is possible to send food there, where starvation has been prevalent during the last few months. Perhaps families all over this country who are able to do so, will save a little on their own food budgets every week, and put those savings into a fund, to be forwarded once a month to the Greek War Relief Association.

The gallant fight which Greece put up, first against the Italians, and then against the Germans, certainly delayed the attack on Russia, and there are still Greek soldiers, sailors, and fliers who escaped from their country and are fighting side by side with the men of the United Nations. It will bring us all some relief to think that there no longer will be women and children dying of starvation in the streets of Greek cities.

I was interested to hear the other day that the Division of Physical Fitness, which has been developed in connection with the work of the New York State War Council, and which is directed by Dr. Hiram A. Jones, is carrying on an active program. I think our young people and our war industry workers should be encouraged to keep their bodies fit.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL