My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO, New Brunswick, Friday—Before I finish my story about the Farmers Federation in Asheville, N. C., I would like to tell you of one other phase of their work. They call it the Lord's Acre.

It is often hard to pay the minister's salary in a little country church, and yet not to have a church would be unthinkable, so members of the congregation set aside land and plant it for the support of the church. This plan has worked so well that last year they were visited by more than 80 missionaries who wished to study this method of meeting the expenses of small and struggling churches.

There is one other thing I would like to tell you also about Asheville College. Nearly all of the students earn a good part of their education by working in their flourishing handcraft shop. Their teacher is very ingenious, and she showed us a summer hat of corn shucks which made one really envious. They have some little pottery salt and pepper shakers in which they tell me the salt never clogs, even in the dampest weather.

Some of the weaving is expertly done, so much so that I planned at once to send in some Christmas orders, for we are nearing the month of August and I must begin to think about my Christmas list! It will be a vastly different one this year, for I think War Stamps and Bonds will be our chief gifts, except for the toys which children must have. Otherwise they would feel that Santa Claus had been conquered by the war, and that we certainly must prevent.

And now at last I will return to my diary of more recent events. I left Washington on Wednesday morning by a plane which was delayed almost an hour by headwinds. I worked for a little while in New York City, saw a friend on business, and caught an afternoon plane for Boston. There I was met by some representatives of the Harvard Post-War Problems Council, which is working with our International Student Service Summer groups. I had a short informal session with them, and caught the night train for East Machias, Maine.

Transportation to the Island of Campobello nowadays is very complicated, for one must take a taxi from East Machias to Lubeck. No regular ferry runs anymore, so one has to make a special date with a boat to get across the very narrow and swiftly-running bit of water between the mainland and the Island. Then one is ordinarily met by a truck, the same truck which brings supplies and the mail once a day. You and your bag get aboard and you are very grateful when you find yourself safely in the midst of the Campobello International Student Service Summer Institute.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL