My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—Yesterday morning we had an early but a gay breakfast at the apartment in New York City with two young guests. Then Miss Thompson and I caught the train for Hyde Park. Travel seems to be very heavy and I wondered if I was going to get to the window in time to buy a family ticket. However, the agent caught sight of me, and as my check was all made out, he handed me my ticket without any delay.

I found Mrs. Bruce Gould waiting at the gate of the train. We worked together on the way up, so that when we arrived all our talking was done and I was able to pick up the two little girls and take Mrs. Gould over to see the view from the south porch of the big house and the library. We didn't have a great deal of time, so we had only a hurried visit to the library and she felt rather cheated that she could not spend more time looking at the different exhibits.

She was particularly interested in the copies of the President's speeches, showing how many times a speech has to be revised. On the way back to the cottage I showed her Nellie Johannesen's weaving. I think homespun may become quite popular where the weavers have stocks of wool on hand are able to furnish really good material even during the present shortage.

After lunch Mrs. Gould went back to New York City and Miss Thompson and I worked on the mail and did a number of things in the house. Finally, we went for a long walk, since I thought it was cool enough for the woods to be free of mosquitoes. The two little girls found themselves so bitten up, however, they raced for home. This morning seems to be another wonderfully cool day and I can hardly believe it is July and not September.

I find that I am not the only person who is concerned about employment of older people. There is an organization called "The Forty Plus", which has branches in many of the big cities. It originated, I think, in Boston. But the most recent letter I have had comes to me from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The president, Mr. George Sheridan, writes: "The club was originally formed with the idea of relieving a situation then thought to have been brought about by the depression and with the hope in mind that as conditions improved, the situation would automatically take care of itself and that men with the ability of our members would find no difficulty in securing positions.

"To a certain extent this has been true, and we feel we have had good success, having placed 571 men since our organization was formed in Pittsburgh in July 1939 to the present time; but we are still meeting with and endeavoring to overcome, a prejudice to hiring men over forty years of age. We are trying to correct an impression on the part of many employers that the ability and capacity for work of men over that age is less than that of younger men."

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL