My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—The other night I saw a film called "Native Land." It is a beautiful piece of photography and most artistically produced. There are still people in this country and there are still parts of it where the horrors which "Native Land" pictures may be found.

Sometimes I think that the greatest good anyone in this field could do would be to write the truth day after day. Then people would have something which would lie about halfway between the worst side of the picture, as presented in "Native Land," and the worst side of the reverse, as presented in Mr. Pegler's columns. Both pictures are truthful, but they are not the whole picture on either side. It is the whole picture which shows the real trend towards which we are striving and working for the future.

I reached New York City yesterday morning by the night train from Washington. After a hurried breakfast at the apartment and a short time spent at Calvary Church, I went up to my cousin, Mrs. Parish's house. We came down together for the funeral services of my cousin, Mr. Parish. It was a great comfort to her that Mr. Sumner Welles and her nephew, Lieutenant Harry Parish, were able to be with her at the services. Then we drove to Tivoli, N. Y., for the burial in the old churchyard where so many of our family lie.

I reached home about 4:30 and found that there was a demand from the children for a picnic supper. They helped carry all the food down by the fireplace and built their own fire. After I returned from meeting Miss Thompson and Mrs. Fleeson O'Donnell and her little girl, we walked down to see the results of all the preparations, which seemed to be very satisfactory. One of the children presented me with a beautifully roasted marshmallow. They all assured me that they had eaten all they wanted. I think the enjoyment of these parties is always more in what they do than in what they eat.

The Yiddish Theatre Division for the Army and Navy Relief Funds is giving a benefit at the National Theatre in New York City. I hope very much that it will be very successful. I am much impressed by the way in which the theatrical and other artistic groups throughout the country have actually given, not only of their money, but of their time for these benefit performances. They have brought in a great deal of money throughout the nation and I think all of us are grateful to them.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL