My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Tuesday—Yesterday afternoon about 35 Hi-Y students from the Northwest came in to see what rooms are now open in the White House. I talked to them for a few minutes while they had refreshments in the State Dining Room.

These young boys are between fifteen and eighteen and their trip is sponsored by the Young Men's Christian Association. A great many of them had earned all or part of the money which they had used for this trip. I imagine, as the war goes on, that fewer and fewer trips will be possible. Yet, I am always glad to feel that even a few young people can take back to their communities the impressions gained by seeing their country and their country's capital.

It may be possible for them in the future to see a great deal more of the world, but perhaps nothing will ever be as vivid as the first impression which comes from a trip across the whole United States. There is such a variety of scenery, such a variety of occupation, that I think it is impossible for any young person not to get a sense of the greatness and power of his nation.

That sense is a good thing to have at the present time. It awakens a confidence both in the present and in the future. As I looked at the faces of these young boys, I felt a pride and a confidence in the material we produce to meet the future.

One boy came from across the border in Canada, several of them from near Seaside, Ore., which has just been shelled and the war seems close to them.

On Wednesday, July 1st, I am told that a campaign instituted by the "Retailers For Victory" will undertake to stop all sale of ordinary merchandise in retail stores of the country for fifteen minutes, from 12:00 noon to 12:15 p.m. will be devoted to the sale of war savings bonds and stamps. That will mean that in big cities, in little towns and small villages, stores can plan a ceremony where as many citizens as possible can attend and buy stamps and bonds. There is a great advantage in having the time set because it is so easy to say to yourself: "Oh, I'll buy one the next time I come in," and the next time never comes.

I am going this afternoon to an exhibition of some clothes which is being prepared by "Bundles For America." This display features 25 garments selected in New York City as showing the greatest ingenuity in making use of salvage material. I saw some wonderful pictures in the paper yesterday where patches of different types of materials were used in new designs, so evidently we had better brush up on our ingenuity in the use of materials!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL