My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Yesterday morning I went to an exhibition at the Hotel Gotham branch of the Grand Central Art Galleries. This exhibition is for the benefit of scholarships in American citizenship at Barnard College, Columbia University. It is fitting, therefore, that the portraits, sculptured heads and paintings should all feature American historical personages and scenes.

There are some beautiful and interesting paintings with captions well worth reading. No one with an interest in our history should fail to see this exhibition, for many of the paintings are in private collections and may not often be seen by the public.

I was glad to see the portrait of Samuel Bard and wondered if it would inspire a few of our medical students to stop at the little Hyde Park church to see the memorial tablet there. Bard College also has interesting books and documents which once belonged to Dr. Samuel Bard.

Robert R. Livingston is in the collection and there are some interesting portraits of women. I liked particularly the bust of James Monroe by Attilio Piccirilli. After I had seen the whole collection, I wandered into an adjoining room to look at a very charming collection of landscapes.

Later I walked up to our 65th Street houses thinking I would take a last look around to make sure that nothing was overlooked or neglected, but the outer doors were tightly closed and I was unable to enter. I lunched with a friend and returned to the apartment to see various people with whom I had appointments.

My friend, Mrs. Franklin K. Lane, Sr., has been staying here for a few days and I was delighted to have the opportunity yesterday afternoon to meet her young grandson, who is one of our neighbors in this part of the city. I remember young Mr. Lane Kaufmann as a little boy and it was interesting to meet him now as a grown person with something reminiscent about him of his grandfather.

In the evening I attended a dinner given to Dr. Alvin Johnson. The history of his attainments is one of such scholarship and of such variety of experience in different parts of the country that one is left with a feeling of gratitude that he is now a fellow citizen of the City of New York.

I am thankful that he heads the New School for Social Research where, with his gifts of courage and appreciation for ability in different fields, he can make a contribution to liberal education which would not be possible for a man of less heroic mould. I hope he derived some pleasure from the many pleasant things which were said about him last night. At least, he must have recognized his friends who spoke from the heart.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL