My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—I did not have space yesterday to tell you of the very beautiful pageant they are giving every night this week at the Muhlenberg College Celebration. It records the contribution of the whole Muhlenberg family and is also historically interesting. Since Tuesday was Women's Day, I was particularly interested in the contribution which women of the early days brought to the country.

I doubt very much whether any of the men could have accomplished what they did without the backing of their staunch and courageous women. These women were very capable and managed a household on a businesslike basis which met the needs of their day. We have new needs and different situations to cope with today, but we would do well to study the standards and methods of these successful pioneer women.

I went to the Appellate Court in New York City yesterday morning to see our son, Franklin, Jr., and two other young men take the oath as lawyers. I must say I am glad that these examinations are successfully over and do not have to be taken at the end of the war.

Then I went to the Navy Relief Society Headquarters and was photographed with Miss Alice Marble, who is helping to distribute the little banks throughout the city in which people can put small coins for the benefit of the Navy Relief Society.

From there I went to the Mark Twain Foundation, where the sculptor, Mr. Walter Russell, has a studio. He has done a most interesting head of the President, but never has had the opportunity to sit before him for ten minutes and to watch him in action. It is natural, I think, that Mr. Russell should feel a desire to do this. He says that it is difficult to translate the spiritual quality of a man into the sculptured face without a real study of the subject and his changing expressions. I can well understand this, and hope the President will have time to see Mr. Russell some time before the head is finished.

Then I returned to my apartment to hold a committee meeting over the luncheon table. After lunch, I walked over to the Judson Health Center, which is on Thompson Street just south of Washington Square. Dr. Campbell, who is in charge, certainly succeeds in using every bit of available space and real health education is going on in this center.

Later, at my apartment, we held a small afternoon meeting to discuss what could be done to assist the Progressive Schools Committee. It has been caring for refugee students, whose parents, one or both, are in this country, but not as yet sufficiently well established to take proper care of the children.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL