My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—I had an interesting morning visiting. First I went to the school which Diana Hopkins has attended this winter—St. Agnes Episcopal School in Alexandria, Va., of which Mrs. Helen Macan is principal. The school is situated on Bishop Lloyd's old family estate. There are only a small number of boarders so that there can be a feeling of real home life. The additional number of day scholars allows for rubbing up against more varieties of human beings, which I think is very good for young people.

The staff seems to me very remarkable, for we went into no classroom where there did not seem to be absorbed attention on the part of the students. They go from kindergarten to high school and the school has just won a much coveted standing in the state both in Latin and French. Something which seems to me almost as important as the educational side of the school, is the evident realization by the students that their student government belongs to them and, having made the rules, they must abide by them. In study hall, there was no teacher, but I never saw a quieter and more orderly study period.

From the school, I went to the headquarters of the Army Personnel Classification System. Dr. Walter V. Bingham, Major-General James A. Ulio and Colonel Madison Pearson showed me around. From this particular group, go all the rules and policies which govern the classification centers in outlying places throughout the country. Tests of every kind are being made out there. They are discovering the ways of training men and the best way of selecting them, matters which require careful analysis.

I was happy to see that while there are a great many experts who have evidently had long experience in the line in which they are working, they are also using a great many young people who have graduated from college recently and studied in some special field and won high honors. One young lady was introduced to me as a Mt. Holyoke graduate and a wizard at mathematics.

I was a little late in getting back to the White House, so my friend Mrs. Adolph Miller and I are going to be a little late at lunch. We are going to a very old friend, Mrs. Franklin K. Lane, who is staying here with her son and daughter-in-law. She arrived here some days ago from New Mexico and I have been trying to see her ever since.

She is not very strong and could not come to see me, so this is my first chance to be with her. I shall make her tell me all she knows about conditions as they now are around Santa Fe and New Mexico, for I find new things are happening at present everywhere in our country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL