My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—Yesterday afternoon, the United China Relief Committee of the District of Columbia held their first meeting in the White House to inaugurate their money raising campaign. This campaign is being conducted all over the country at the present time. I was so glad to be able to have a meeting here, for the relief job needed in China at the present time seems to be so vital to their whole war effort that I feel we are aiding the war in helping to lighten the burdens of the civilian population.

It is interesting to me that the two nations whose men are fighting with the greatest courage, vigor and success, are China and Russia. In both of these countries, at the same time, there is going forward a concerted development of programs designed to benefit the everyday life of the people as a whole. It would seem to indicate that the men feel that at home there is no lessening in the determination to make their government responsive to their needs.

Something is being done in Boston which I wish we could duplicate all over the country. Mr. Allan Forbes and Governor Saltonstall have organized all the war relief societies into one United Nations Relief. The nine major war relief organizations are participating— United China Relief, Polish Relief, Free French, Bundles for Britain, Netherlands War Relief, Greek War Relief, The English Speaking Union, British—American Ambulance Corps and Russian War Relief. They are making one concerted drive for funds to aid the people of all these nations. There is a representative of each nation on the executive committee.

It seems to me that action of this kind on a national basis would enormously simplify for all of us our contribution to the general effort. Everyone of us wants to be a part of the American expression of generosity to those who are suffering more than we are, but sometimes the multitude of demands makes it difficult. One drive for one fund would simplify matters.

It was nice to find our daughter-in-law, Ruth, here for a short visit. She flew up from Texas partly for business, but has given us much pleasure. She tells me that our granddaughter, Chandler, has undertaken to watch over the rounding up of the cattle on the ranch since her father is away. At the age of eight, she stays in the saddle all day until they actually go and bring her in. Even the young members of the family apparently can do something to replace those who are on active service.

I had lunch today with the wives for the heads of various government agencies to consider what improvements, if any, might be made in the programs for new workers in the rapidly expanding agencies.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL