My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—It is curious how one can live near people one wants very much to see and still see them rarely. Last night, I finally succeeded in having Secretary and Mrs. Morgenthau here to dinner. I have been trying to see Mrs. Morgenthau ever since I returned from the West. Our only other guest was Judge Robert Marx, of Cincinnati, Ohio, who is in Washington for a day or so.

After dinner we had a newsreel and a movie called "On The Shores Of Tripoli," a picture about the Marine Corps. We were, therefore, able to induce the President to stay and see it. It proved to be a good picture and very entertaining, but I don't know whether we were wise to beguile the President away from his work, because I found him still at his desk at 1:00 o'clock this morning.

We have left spring weather behind us in Washington and are right in the middle of summer. Our flowering bushes are too beautiful for words. Someone remarked to me this morning that the weather was so lovely one could not be annoyed with anyone. I am not sure that this is entirely my feeling. The effect on me of these first warm days is so completely relaxing that I think I am too lazy to take much action of any kind, but that doesn't imply a completely kindly attitude toward the world in general.

I put the top of my car down and went to meet the train at noon. Unless I have something which really must be done, I don't feel that tires or gas should be used. But, since trains have to be met, I enjoyed the drive and had a nice chat with some soldiers, who came up to my car when I parked near the station. They asked for autographs and told me they were on their way to receive training. One boy told me he had just come in and hoped that he could do a good job.

The usual crowds of school children were in the station, but this year there have been far fewer than usual in Washington. Some of them have written me that they had given up their trips to buy Defense Stamps and Bonds. Others probably found it impossible to find any place to lay their heads.

Dr. Herbert V. Evatt, Attorney General and Minister of State for External Affairs of Australia and Mrs. Evatt came to lunch, accompanied by Mrs. Felix Frankfurter. I enjoyed very much talking to them. It always seems to me that the Australians have a point of view very much akin to our democratic aspirations.

This afternoon I am going to the sale for the benefit of the Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, and later there will be some guests at tea.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL