My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN DIEGO, Friday—Yesterday morning, Miss Thompson made me do some work. The morning was a busy one, but I went out in time to lunch with some friends and do some errands before I prepared to leave on my cross-country trek.

It seems a very short time since I took this trip in order to be with my daughter, but long ago I had planned to go to San Diego, Cal., about this time to see our two sons. One never knows what may happen these days, and so I did not feel it wise to delay my visit any longer, and here I am in San Diego.

Our boys have been extremely busy and their wives have settled down to the kind of life which adjusts itself to the hours which war service demands. War has given us, however, an appreciation of the good fortune we enjoy whenever we can be with the people we love. We know that tomorrow, or next week, or next month, they may not only be out of our reach, but beyond our knowledge.

Their safety will probably depend on the fact that we, as well as all others, will not know where they are and, naturally, we cling all the more to even semi-normal times together. These are days to store up memories which will see us through whatever may lie ahead.

You must have been as glad as I was the last few days, to read of the safe arrival of General MacArthur in Australia. It is good news, it lifts the spirit and gives us a sense of how unimportant any of our own small sacrifices are. If only we can achieve quickly that point of military superiority which alone means peace will someday come to us again.

I am very happy to see that there is established a War Relocation Authority, which will have charge of the program for relocation and employment of persons who must be moved out of military areas. Unfortunately, in a war, many innocent people must suffer hardships to safeguard the nation. One feels that a program which provides work is certainly better than having nothing to do.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL