My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Sunday—I was happy to have our son, Franklin, Jr., and his wife lunch with me on Friday in New York City. He is still rather weak from his appendectomy, and the doctors tell me it will be a little while before he can return to his destroyer. Destroyer duty in winter requires great physical activity and, since he has not been home since sometime in October, we are rejoicing in having a chance to see him, even though one never likes to go through operations.

On Friday afternoon, I saw a number of people in New York City, and in the evening I started by air for Seattle, Washington. We seem to have an epidemic of appendix operations in the family, for I heard that our daughter, Anna, was to be operated on Monday morning.

I imagine every mother feels a particularly close tie with her daughters. Fortunately for me, my son-in-law and the children in his family have grown very close to me and we want to be together both in times of anxiety and happiness. I cannot help being tremendously grateful for the fact that I am able to go to my children when they need me. I know so many mothers who go through great anxiety when, for financial reasons very often, they can not bridge the space which lies between them and their children.

The only day on which I shall regret not being able to be home this week is the Fourth of March, for the President always feels that there is a spiritual significance attached to that day. Nevertheless I think that out here, and in every home in the country, we can think back to the Inauguration Day of 1933, and the difficulties which faced us then, and say a prayer in our hearts.

We have come through many difficulties and made some dent on the solution of the problems which faced us then. We will, I am sure, continue to have steadfastness and courage to go through this even greater crisis and meet the unknown future with undaunted determination to carry through to a happier era for mankind.

I never cross the continent by air without being grateful for this method of transportation, which makes space so insignificant. Travelling is always an opportunity for me, not only to read, which is a refreshing stimulant, but also to look at the vastness of our nation and reflect upon our tremendous opportunities, which we are not yet using to full advantage.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL